Rising global population is straining water resources, with two-thirds experiencing severe scarcity annually.
By 2030, a 40% gap between supply and demand is predicted. Africa faces the highest impact, with half the population in ten countries lacking access to drinking water. Drinking water, a scarce yet fundamental resource, needs global protection.

Rising global population is straining water resources, with two-thirds experiencing severe scarcity annually. By 2030, a 40% gap between supply and demand is predicted. Africa faces the highest impact, with half the population in ten countries lacking access to drinking water. Drinking water, a scarce yet fundamental resource, needs global protection.

Increasing population, water consumption, climate change, and aging water infrastructure are pressuring the world’s freshwater resources. This affects water availability, quality, and complicates supply systems, threatening human health and hindering economic growth.

Industries face challenges in meeting water needs sustainably, with risks including poor water resilience, potential permit loss, and increased costs and CO2 emissions due to limited or lower-quality resources.

Climate change poses significant risks to all organizations, necessitating a thorough assessment and adaptation to these challenges. The environmental footprints of these entities also warrant careful scrutiny. The escalating risks from extreme water-related weather events, such as droughts, floods, storms, and sea level rise, are particularly concerning. Water supply and management are becoming increasingly precarious across many regions, impacting not only organizations but also the communities they serve. This underscores the urgent need for proactive measures to mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Water supply processes contribute to 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions due to the energy required for pumping, treating, desalination, and distribution. The energy sector, which consumes about 10% of global freshwater, is expected to increase water usage by over 10% by 2030. Given the interlinkage of water and energy sectors, united efficiency measures are needed for sustainable use of these resources.